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Archive for August, 2012

SBTC in Canada

10.Aug.2012 by phil.henson

After we all got over the fact that our destination of St. Catharine’s, Ontario is actually SOUTH of Craftsbury, the athletes and coaches of the Small Boat Training Center hit the road on Sunday to start our journey to the place where legends are made: The Royal Canadian Henley Regatta.

Some of us spent the night somewhere in New York State, while others went all the way through to Canada in one trip. Regardless, we all got across the border without any difficulties, and wound up on Henley Island to rig boats (all 19 of them) on Monday morning.  We then moved ourselves into four town houses that we’ve rented from Brock University for the week. With air conditioning, a full kitchen, and a bed for each of us, we couldn’t have asked for a better setup!

Due to the nature of the regatta, some SBTC athletes started racing on Day 1, while others have had to wait with excessive amounts of taper-induced energy, waiting for their chance to battle it out on the water. Craftsbury has been doing very well so far, with many boats advancing all the way from the heats to the finals, and even on to winning Henley Gold (U23 Men’s Lightweight Single and Senior Men’s Lightweight Four). Results so far can be found on the Canadian Henley website or you can check out the latest press release for SBTC specific results.

That’s all for now – check back in a couple days for a new blog post, and don’t forget to look at the press releases to see results of all the Craftsbury athletes!

[I apologize for the lack of pictures, but it’s been difficult to send large files over the internet here. We’ll be sure to post a bunch at the end of the racing.]

Gardens and Vegetables

10.Aug.2012 by Caitlin Patterson
Between training sessions, quite a few of us (okay, mostly the girls…) enjoy spending time in the gardens around the Outdoor Center and Elinor’s.  This has been my first summer in the East, and I’m finding the large variety of wild and garden plants, as well as the speed with which they grow, to be quite fascinating.  There is never any shortage of things to do in the garden, especially here in early August.  The weeds are as energetic as ever, with plenty of rain and sun to encourage new sprouts to pop up each day.  More importantly, the vegetables are growing extremely quickly, with the cucumbers and summer squash requiring almost daily picking.
Bright flowers along the garden border.

Bright flowers along the garden border.

From these two rows of cucumber plants, consisting of 3 different varieties, we've been harvesting around 70-100 cucumbers every other day!

From these two rows of cucumber plants, consisting of 3 different varieties, we've been harvesting around 70-100 cucumbers every other day!

Cucumber flowers, spring-like vines, and baby cucs.  These plants are lightly furred with spines and expertly hide fully grown cucumbers, so that each cucumber picking session quickly turns into a cucumber treasure hunt.

Cucumber flowers, spring-like vines, and baby cucs. These plants are lightly furred with spines and expertly hide fully grown cucumbers, so that each cucumber picking session quickly turns into a cucumber treasure hunt.

A few long, skinny cucumbers that are almost ready for picking.  All of the vegetables we pick go straight to the Outdoor Center kitchen, where they soon find their way into salads, soups, and sautés for all diners to enjoy.

A few long, skinny cucumbers that are almost ready for picking. All of the vegetables we pick go straight to the Outdoor Center kitchen, where they soon find their way into salads, soups, and sautés for all diners to enjoy.

We also have fantastic beets, peppers, tomatoes, and tomatillos growing.

We also have fantastic beets, peppers, tomatoes, and tomatillos growing.

Yellow zucchini and patty pan squash are two of the types of summer squash we've grown this year.

Yellow zucchini and patty pan squash are two of the types of summer squash we've grown this year.

It's fun to find all the bright yellow hiding underneath big green leaves.

It's fun to find all the bright yellow hiding underneath big green leaves.

Near Elinor's, there are two winter squash gardens, with vines reaching into the wild grassy borders.

Near Elinor's, there are two winter squash gardens, with vines reaching into the wild grassy borders.

The tiny butternut squash...

The tiny butternut squash...

… quickly balloon into edible fruit.

… quickly balloon into edible fruit.

In the squash garden it is possible to study many color differences within the same type of squash.

In the squash garden it is possible to admire the many color differences between squash of the same type.

A few of the squash varieties, like the sugar pumpkins at bottom, seem to think fall is coming.  Just a few days ago, they started turning orange, with a faint glow like a misting of spray paint at first, which has now turned into full-fledged orange.

A few of the squash varieties, like the sugar pumpkins at bottom, seem to think fall is coming. Just a few days ago, they started turning color, with a faint glow like a misting of spray paint at first, which has now turned into full-fledged orange.

The garden scene wouldn't be complete without garden pests and helpers.  Finding one of these little frogs (or maybe they are toads) always makes digging in the garden even more fun, and fortunately there are quite a few of them hopping around.

The garden scene wouldn't be complete without garden pests and helpers. Finding one of these little frogs (or maybe they are toads) always makes digging in the garden even more fun, and fortunately there are quite a few of them hopping around.

 

On a different note, the Outdoor Center has been hosting the USSA J2 camp this week.  On Monday, several members of the GRP ran the Elmore uphill time trial with the J2 group.  Gordon set an impressive new men’s record, and I think all or nearly all of the GRPers who ran set PRs.  There were some very quick J2s, and everyone clearly gave the time trial their best effort.  Here are just a few photos, although the picture quality isn’t very good with the sun-speckled lighting.

Nils in the Elmore time trial

Nils in the Elmore time trial

Dylan on Elmore

Dylan on Elmore

Gordon speeding by for a 16:00 record on Elmore

Gordon speeding by for a 16:00 record on Elmore

 

The J2s are finishing their camp and leaving the Outdoor Center tomorrow morning.  For the GRP, tomorrow brings skate rollerski intervals for some of us, biathlon races at Jericho for a few, and the continuation of Canadian Henley for the rowers.

Italy Revisited

8.Aug.2012 by Susan Dunklee

One of my long time biathlon teammates, Laura Spector, recently decided to not continue competing this year.  Laura has always been an awesome training buddy who can be counted on for the longest biking or hiking adventures and I’ve missed having her around this summer.  She was also instrumental in starting the forward momentum of the US women’s biathlon team.   During the 2010-2011 season, I couldn’t wait to look up results and see how much Laura and the other World Cup ladies had improved each week.  For the first time, we really started to believe we belonged with the best athletes in the world.

Best of luck Laura as you pursue your biology interests!  Anytime you need a break from the lab or fruit flies, the mountains await.  We still need to summit  Mount Timpanogos someday.

The following blog post is a write-up I did for NENSA midway through last season about my first World Cup mass start race.  During the experience, I couldn’t help but reminisce about what it was like watching Laura racing a year earlier.

On an evening in early January 2011, a small group of American biathletes crowded around a single computer screen in a Czech hotel.  We were there competing in IBU Cups (biathlon’s equivalent of OPA Cups) but at that moment we were much more interested in what was happening on the World Cup in Oberhof, Germany.   One of our own, Laura Spector, had earned a start spot in the mass start and was competing as the lone American.  We managed to coax the hotel’s weak wireless signal to stream the race onto one computer and watched Laura ski a very smart race.  She looked relaxed under the brilliant lights and in front of a crowd of 30,000 spectators.   After starting out near the tail end of the pack during her first loop, she relied on her solid prone shooting to move up.    I was very impressed.    

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Laura racing in Oberhof in 2011.  Photo: NordicFocus/USBA

Mass starts are the most exclusive events on the biathlon World Cup.   Only 30 women can start each race, which is the maximum number a shooting range can accommodate at once.  25 start spots are saved for the highest ranked women on the season’s overall points list.  The remaining 5 are allocated based on results from earlier in the week.  Laura earned one of those last 5 spots and was the first American woman in years to compete in a mass start.    It was inspiring for us to see her in the mix.   Even our typically reserved Finnish coach, Jonne Kahkonen, couldn’t stop beaming as he watched the race unfold on the computer screen.

That evening was a turning point; it marked a shift in our team’s expectations.  We had all trained and raced with Laura over the past several years.  If she could do it, what was stopping us?   Americans Sara Studebaker and Haley Johnson soon earned spots in subsequent mass starts that season.   As a team, we began to expect that someone would qualify to represent us in the mass starts, and it might not be the same athlete(s) every time.

About a year after watching Laura’s mass start debut, I found myself standing nervously on the starting line before my first World Cup mass start in Antholz, Italy.  I had qualified based off of a sprint race a couple days before, which had been my career best.  In front of me, I could see rows of athletes filled with French, Norwegian, Russian, and German suits.  Above me towered the spectacular Dolomite Mountains.   With a minute to the start, the roaring crowd had fallen silent, replaced by an eerie heartbeat thumping from the loud speakers. “Boom-boom….boom-boom… boom-boom.”  I felt nervous, but I smiled; standing on this starting line was not such a bad place to be.  

As the sole American qualifier, I found it strange to go through my normal pre-race routines without any of my teammates.  Rather than having to zero my rifle in 5 minutes, I could take up to 40 minutes if I needed, and I shot a few extra clips to better warm-up.  I conferred with coach Jonne about race tactics, including what line I should take over the finishing stretch if I needed to out-sprint someone.  My teammate Sara had raced the first leg of our relay earlier in the week and had some valuable starting advice: “don’t be afraid to stop and let a pileup untangle itself,” she told me, “and don’t be nervous- the worst you can do is 30th place.”  I decided the most important part of my race plan was to have fun and be patient.  

A mass start is very much a shooter’s race and it favors the patient.  The field doesn’t break up much until the first trip to the shooting range.   The key to success is to avoid the penalty loop at all costs.  I knew I’d probably lose a little time to the leaders on skis, but I could easily lose a disastrous amount of time by missing targets.    Shooting in a pack is the most challenging type of shooting because you can be easily distracted by the people around you.  You can see them out of the corner of your eye and hear how fast they are shooting.  You are aware of when they leave the mat and you start thinking about the seconds you are losing.  I knew I needed to remain as calm as possible in the shooting range in order to hit targets.  “Patience,” I reminded myself one last time.

Before I knew it, the gun went off and the race had begun.  Four years of college carnival mass starts were perfect preparation for the hectic scramble off the starting line.  I love the Zen-like feeling of mass starts.  My senses narrow and sharpen, and I automatically react to momentary gaps in the pack.  I pass people by double poling through narrow margins.  About a kilometer into my race, I saw a couple racers tangle out of the corner of my eye but we quickly left them behind.  Once the pack settled into two long columns, I focused on skiing smoothly and efficiently, trying to match the rhythm of the woman in front of me.  

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In the pack in Antholz.  Photo: NordicFocus/USBA

In our first visit to the shooting range, I had to shoot on my bib number: 27.  It was near the entrance to the range, so I started my approach procedure early.  Before reaching the mat, I took deep breathes to ventilate, scanned the stadium flags and the range flags to see what the wind was doing, and opened the rifle’ sight covers and bolt.  The process felt automatic thanks to the thousands of times I had practiced it.  I landed on the mat, swung off my rifle, loaded a clip and dropped into prone position.  I quickly checked to make sure I wasn’t holding any unnecessary tension in my hands and shoulders.  Then there was nothing more except the target and the pressure of the trigger against my fingertip.  Bolt, breathe, shoot.  Bolt, breathe, shoot…  I was one of the last racers off my mat, but I had hit all five of my targets.  My reward was seeing a mass of colorful spandex veering right into the penalty loop while I continued straight onto the course.  Only a handful of other racers also cleaned that first stage.   I was sitting in the top 10!

The remainder of the race (4 more 2.5 km loops and 3 more shooting stages) passed by in a blur.  I settled in behind the pack ahead of me.  Charging up the biggest hill on the course past a mob of coaches and spectators, my eyes sought out an American jacket.  One of our coaches, Armin Auchentaller, was holding up a magnet target board showing me where the shots from my first shooting had landed.  My group was centered and he hollered “no corrections!” as I glided past.  I met his eyes for an instant and nodded that I got the message.  In the next prone stage, I missed a couple shots and fell back several places.  Despite not losing much ground on skis, 5 misses over the course of the entire race landed me near the back of the field going into the final lap.  With all the shooting behind me there was no reason to be patient anymore.  Jonne had instructed me to “ski like a woodpecker” on the last lap and I dug to the bottom of the well to pass one more racer.

My finishing place was the same as my bib number and starting rank.  27th place out of 30 competitors may not look particularly exciting on paper, but I felt good about it.  In many ways the experience was more valuable than any stats on a results sheet.  Under the pressure of head to head shooting, I had cleaned two stages and that boosted my confidence.  Sitting in the top 10 midway through the race gave me a clear glimpse of what was possible.  We still had plenty of racing to come later in the season and our team was moving forward.  I left Antholz feeling hungry.

Tunnel Skiing

5.Aug.2012 by Ida Sargent

Today was our second day in the Torsby Ski Tunnel in Sweden and I’m not sick of it yet!  The tunnel is a 1.3km loop which you ski in one direction, then turn and ski it in the other direction, and the entire thing probably takes about 10 minutes.  I expected it to be quite boring but it has been really fun so far.  It’s easy to pass time when you’re catching up with teammates whom you haven’t seen in several months and listening to the pop music which plays throughout the tunnel.  The skiing is also really nice.  The snow is manmade and groomed almost every day but only changed once annually.  It almost has the consistency of sand which sounds weird but its actually very fast and a welcomed change from the resistance of rollerski wheels.   There is great terrain with some fast corners and transitions, a couple steeper climbs and several gradual sections.  The tunnel is refrigerated to -3 degrees Celsius and feels cold and humid especially when you first transition from the summertime weather outside.  I underdressed the first day because it felt absurd to bundle when the weather was so nice outside.  Yesterday afternoon we did a combo workout where we started skiing in long underwear, hats, and buffs, and finished with a run in shorts and sports bras.

At the start of the tunnel.  Its wide enough for 2-3 skate lanes and there is a classic track on either side.  There is a small biathlon range to the left of this photo with a few targets.

At the start of the tunnel. Its wide enough for 2-3 skate lanes and there is a classic track on either side. There is a small biathlon range to the left of this photo with a few targets.

Giant AC unit attached to the back of the building

Giant AC unit attached to the back of the building

This is where the building (entrance to the tunnel) is attached to the Ski tunnel.  There is also a rollerski track on site which rolls over the tunnel!

This is where the building (entrance to the tunnel) is attached to the Ski tunnel. There is also a rollerski track on site which rolls over the tunnel!

It is somewhat camouflaged but you can still see where the tunnel snakes along the hillside.

It is somewhat camouflaged but you can still see where the tunnel snakes along the hillside.

The stadium in Torsby includes lit ski trails, a Ski Tunnel, a rollerski loop, a biathlon gym, athlete dorms and cabins, indoor and outdoor gyms, and soccer fields; all of which receive lots of use.  What a Nordic culture!

The stadium in Torsby includes lit ski trails, a Ski Tunnel, a rollerski loop, a biathlon gym, athlete dorms and cabins, indoor and outdoor gyms, and soccer fields; all of which receive lots of use. What a Nordic culture!

Outdoor gyms are quite common in Sweden and I have already seen a couple including one at our hotel.  I've got a few ideas to bring back to our own "Monkey gym."

Outdoor gyms are quite common in Sweden and I have already seen a couple including one at our hotel. I've got a few ideas to bring back to our own "Monkey gym."

Right now our US women’s team is staying in Sunne (we like to pronounce it Sunny), Sweden which is 35km from Torsby.  When we are not skiing we’ve passed the time watching the Olympics, enjoying picnic lunches and other great Scandinavian food (Brown cheese, fish paste, fresh bread, smoked salmon, berries), and kicking the jetlag before our joint camp with the Swedish National team.  After a ski tomorrow morning we will drive a couple hours north to Salen and the camp gets going tomorrow evening!