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Archive for the ‘Misc’ Category

Pair Racing: Senior Trials and Royal Canadian Henley

23.Aug.2015 by Parker Washburn

On the last day of July, Andrew Reed and I (along with the rest of the GRP heavyweight men) traveled to Princeton, NJ to compete at the Senior Trials for a chance to represent the US at World Championships in the pair (not a sculling boat!!).  We had rowed together for two and a half weeks leading up to the Trials and were very excited to finally test ourselves against some of the best pairs in the country.  Our event had five entries, which meant that it would have a full progression of racing (time trial, heat, repechage, and final) to determine a winner.  The trials began with a 1900 meter time trial on Sunday night, and we place 4th, but not far behind the other boats.  The next morning we raced in a heat in which the winner would qualify directly for the final and the other crews would be relegated to the repechage (second chance race for qualification).  We did not have our best row in the heat and ended up finishing 3rd; we knew that racing together would be a learning experience and we took several lessons from the heat and were determined to improve in our next race.  In a second opportunity to make the final, we raced in the repechage on Tuesday morning.  We tweaked our race strategy from the day before, knowing that we had to beat only one crew to advance to the final.  We finished second in the repechage (beating out the US lightweight pair), and earned a spot in the four-boat final on Wednesday.  In the final, we had a much more aggressive race plan prepared and we held with the leaders for much race.  In the end, we finished 3rd in a time of 6:34, behind the two crews from the USTC, the winning time was 6:29.5 and 2nd place was 6:32.  Our immediate reaction was disappointment in not having won the final and a spot on the national team, but we were also encouraged by the result.  In only 2.5 weeks we found the speed to compete with some of the best pairs in the country.

A few hours after our last race in Princeton, we loaded up the car and headed west to St. Catharine’s in Ontario, Canada to race in the Championship Pair event at the Royal Canadian Henley.  Members of the GRP and SBTC were already in St. Catharine’s and had a delicious meal of French toast and sausage ready for us when we arrived at 7pm on Wednesday night.  On Thursday, our first full day in Canada, we rigged up our boat and took a paddle to work off the car ride from the day before.  Canadian Henley is one of the most popular regattas of the summer and the racecourse is a packed with boat trailers and rowers.  Luckily, we stayed at Brock University (about a 20’ drive from the racecourse) and were able to escape a lot of the hustle and bustle between practice sessions and races.  Our event started with a heat on Saturday morning and final on Sunday.  On Saturday we lined up against crews from the Canadian National Team training center and pairs containing college rowers doing the summer racing circuit.  Weather conditions on Saturday morning were great; there was a slight cross-headwind but the water was flat and we were primed to race hard.  We had a good start and took a lead quickly.  By 750m into the race we felt very much in control and could relax and conserve some energy.  We won our heat and posted the fastest time of the event, which gave us some confidence going into the final on Sunday.  The good racing conditions of the day before didn’t last and Sunday was a real battle against the wind and water conditions.  A stiff headwind created a lot of choppy water, especially in the first 1000m of the racecourse.  We put together a solid race and were not deterred too much by the conditions.  We won the final by 7.5 seconds!  It was a great way to end a long week of racing.  After collecting our medals and loading our boat onto the trailer, we packed into the car for 10 hour drive back to Craftsbury.  Time to starting thinking about next year…

Here are some pictures from the final in Canada:

RCH Final

Leading in the final 250m of the race.

RCH Awards

On the award dock with the trophy and a new decoration for the dining hall.

Vegetables and beyond in the Craftsbury gardens

14.Aug.2015 by Caitlin Patterson

The gardens at Craftsbury are flourishing! Seeing them every day, working on garden projects with the other GRP women, it’s easy to take the nutritious beauty for granted. So I wanted to share some scenes of growing things and garden work, before the season passes!

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Kait and Heather picking herbs. The leafy green plants are flourishing with all the rain and sun we’ve had – pictured here is kale, dill, radicchio, beets, basil, parsley. Of course the weeds are flourishing too, but we try to stay on top of it as much as possible, and just staged a major weed knockdown yesterday (after this picture was taken…it’s a bit messy here) which helped a bunch!

Trees of kale

Trees of kale

Vibrant rainbow swiss chard

Vibrant rainbow swiss chard

 

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Bumblebees on echinacea flowers near the herb and vegetable gardens. If you’re in the area it’s worth walking by to see the flowers too!

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Heather clipping tomatoes, using the handy features of straps to store some extra clips. We clip the tomato vines up along strings to help support their weight.

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Stunning clusters of fruit

Cherry tomatoes bursting with flavor, such a treat!

Cherry tomatoes bursting with flavor, such a treat!

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Kait and Pam spot a big “sucker” – if we don’t watch out the tomatoes will try to grow into bushes, instead of the way we want them growing vertically. Careful pruning of the suckers prevents this from happening, but they grow quickly and often get away from us.

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One night the skiers decided to stay home and cook our own dinner, partially for the fun of collecting and preparing so many local ingredients – zucchini, kale, tomatoes and more, to go with fantastic hamburgers and homemade buns. Cooking for ourselves one night reminded us how nice it is that we are able to eat amazing meals at the dining hall, cooking for yourself takes serious planning and time, especially in a house of 12+ athletes!

Our house smelled amazing with so much basil

One day several of us skier GRP girls worked on the project of making pesto. First we picked the basil from the COC garden, leaf by leaf, then processed it with walnuts, cheese, oil, and garlic. Our house smelled amazing with so much basil around.

Fresh garlic piled up for processing

Fresh garlic piled up for processing

Liz on the food processor and Heather drying basil leaves

Liz on the food processor and Heather drying basil leaves

Heather, Kait, and Liz checking the pesto... have to make sure it tastes good!

Heather, Kait, and Liz checking the pesto… have to make sure it tastes good!

Heather samples the favorite snack of the day, fresh pesto on a walnut. Great fuel for our strength workout coming up!

Heather samples the favorite snack of the day, fresh pesto on a walnut. Taste = verified to be amazing! Great fuel for our strength workout coming up!

Liz clipping garlic scapes. The COC dining hall made excellent scape pesto when they were in season.

Liz clipping garlic scapes. The COC dining hall made excellent scape pesto when they were in season.

Raspberries and spider webs in the early morning

Raspberries and spider webs in the early morning

Wild black raspberries. It was the best wild berry year I've seen yet in 4 years at Craftsbury!

Parting photo of wild black raspberries. It was the best wild berry year I’ve seen yet in 4 years at Craftsbury!

 

More photos from New Zealand!

27.Jul.2015 by Ida Sargent

I’m back in Vermont now adjusting to the 16 hour time change, remembering what it feels like to sweat in humid weather, eating delicious veggies and berries from the garden, and swimming several times a day.  But before I get fully settled into summer, here are a few more photos from winter training camp in the Southern hemisphere.

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Sophie, Matt, and Jessie on the edge of the Hanging Valley trail

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On an off day we drove to Queenstown but a snowy morning made for a long drive and with many a few stops to chain up along the way.

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The view from the beach in Queenstown. 

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Classic striding from afar (Bernie Gardner photo)

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Anouk and I working on classic technique with some no pole striding. (Bernie Gardner photo)

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The snowy white landscape! (Bernie Gardner photo)

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An ominous cloud bank rolls in over the lodge. The exposed landscape at the Snow Farm made the sunny days incredible and the stormy days as intensely extraordinary. We were lucky and timed both of our off days with the storms, escaping skiing through the extreme whiteouts and howling winds. (Bernie Gardner photo)

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Sophie leads the train in a classic distance time trial with myself, Anouk, and Jessie in hot pursuit. (Bernie Gardner photo)

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Clear skies and fresh corduroy for a late afternoon ski. We couldn’t have been any luckier with the snow conditions an finished the camp with more powdery fresh snow. (Jessie Diggins photo)

Skiing into the sunset

Skiing into the sunset

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The clouds outside the lodge on the last evening made it hard to leave!

Wintertime down South

20.Jul.2015 by Ida Sargent

There’s an old saying the XC skiers are made in the summer.  But sometimes, it’s best to find winter in summer.  Rollerskiing is great but it’s not skiing and the time spent on snow, working on technique and logging quality kilometers is invaluable.  Every time I start skiing after a few months break, I’m amazed by how awkward, long, and slippery my skis feel.  Little stabilizing muscles immediately scream out after being dormant and unused on the stable and firm pavement.  The classic rollerski ratchets are gone and it’s time to remember how to make wax work again.  And of course there is always the pure enjoyment and love of skiing, the blissful feeling of a ski gliding along the snow.  For the past few years the US Ski Team has traveled to Alaska in July for some glacier skiing.  This year we decided to go to actual winter and so we made the longer southern journey down under to find it.  I quickly lost track of the hours spent traveling, especially when we crossed the international date line and jumped into tomorrow.  But many many hours later we arrived on New Zealand’s South island and all the hours on the plane were immediately worth it.   I’m also a competent plane sleeper and was in snooze mode for over eight hours of the twelve hour flight from San Francisco to Aukland, so I arrived relatively fresh and was ready to ski!

We flew into Queenstown, New Zealand and then drove up into the mountains to the Snow Farm, New Zealand’s only Nordic ski area.  The lodge, where we are living for the camp, is 14 kilometers up a road that serves as a rally race course in the summer time.  The switchbacks can be treacherous, especially for those susceptible to car sickness but at the top the landscape opens into an unreal panorama of white rolling hills backed by views of the larger Southern Alps.  Apparently it is the best snow year in over a decade so the skiing has been incredible with over 30 kilometers of trails open.  The first week was cold and clear and we had a long string of extra blue conditions.  Then a front came in with some warmer temps bringing klister conditions for a couple days but the warmer weather was followed by more snow so we should finish the camp off with more hardwax skiing.  We live directly on the trails which creates the perfect training environment conducive to large amounts of skiing, eating, and sleeping and not much else.  Most days we spend over four hours skiing and logging lots of easy distance.  The altitude here is only 5000′ which isn’t too high compared to many summer skiing destinations so we have a couple time trials and interval sessions built into the training plan each week. There is a small gym up here too but we usually drive into Wanaka, the nearest town, a couple times a week to go for a run and hit up a larger gym.  On our off days we’ve had time to get off the mountain and explore the local area but with this much training it isn’t possible unfortunately to head off on any bigger adventures or sightseeing trips.  We have four more days of training left here before debarking on the big journey back in time and north to summer.  How’s that for confusing?

Here’s some pictures from the week so far.

New Zealand from the air!  After so many hours of travel, these views were an energizing start to the trip.

New Zealand from the air! After so many hours of travel, these views were an energizing start to the trip.

SKIING!  The morning fog burns off on the Hanging Valley trail.  (Sophie Caldwell photo)

SKIING! The morning fog burns off on the Hanging Valley trail. (Sophie Caldwell photo)

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The girls enjoying a sunset ski at the Bob Lee hut. Anouk Favre-PIcon from the French National team (far left) joined our team for the camp which has been awesome! Her English has made huge improvements and I’ve tried to speak a little French as well. (Chris Grover photo)

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Jessie puts her feet up to take in the view

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Here is the view from my bedroom room. We’re lucky to have such great training just out the door. It’s just like Craftsbury in the winter time with great skiing, eating, and living, except with a few less trees.

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Down in town in Wanaka, it feels like fall. Sometimes we will run in shorts and tshirts and other times it’s a little colder and even the teapot needs a sweater.  (Anouk photo)

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The floating tree in Lake Wanaka (Jason Cork photo)

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The floating tree without us in the way.  We heard it was the most photographed tree in the world from some locals but further research has showed that it might have some competition.  

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Feeding the ducks in Wanaka

We didn't see a single cloud for the first five days and then the next morning we awoke to this incredible sunrise!

We didn’t see a single cloud for the first five days and then the next morning we awoke to this incredible sunrise!

It was a shock to go from lots of summer daylight to midwinter darkness.  Now instead of waking up with the sun streaming through the windows, it's still dark when I get up but the bonus is lots of incredible breakfast sunrises like this one here.

It was a shock to go from lots of summer daylight to midwinter darkness. Now instead of waking up with the sun streaming through the windows, it’s still dark when I get up but the bonus is lots of incredible breakfast sunrises like this one here.